alternative-pokemon-art:

fuffuster:

kuroba101:

her-royal-punk-rockness:

official-cronusampora:

sevvey6:

colin-emrys-morgan:

I recently went to a con with some friends and you could see these posters all over the expo grounds. I think I speak for everyone when I say that this is a job well done. 

I disagree, I think costumes do equal consent. If a guy goes up to you while you’re wearing a Harley Quinn costume and makes you feel uncomfortable, you automatically have his consent to knock him right in the face with a hammer. I mean, he did willingly walk up to a kickass villain 

I GOT REALLY PISSED AT FIRST
AND THEN I KEPT READING

Oh thank goodness I thought shit was about to get real on this post

Thank fuck that went in a better direction than I expected.


This is my friend Kristen. I went to my first Comicon with her and two of our other friends a couple of months ago. It was the first time I’ve ever been to Comicon, and I had a blast.
Kristen is a beautiful girl and she made her costume very well, so naturally, we were stopping every five minutes or so while people asked to take pictures of her posing, or with their kids, etc. We didn’t mind, and neither did she; if she did, she wouldn’t have worn the costume.
At one point, though, after not having eaten all day, and just generally not feeling well, she started to feel sick and panicky, and had to sit down so she wouldn’t faint. I myself have an anxiety disorder (generalized anxiety disorder), so I know how she felt; our other two friends went ahead while I sat with her to keep her company, because sometimes when you’re having a panic attack, it means the world just to have somebody there with you, even if they’re not saying anything. I went to get her some orange juice and cookies at one point because I thought that maybe her blood sugar was a little low.
And yet, as we were sitting there - even though she was visibly pale and shaking, sitting with her eyes closed and her back against the wall, looking like she was about to throw up - we had at least half a dozen different people come up to her to ask her to take a picture for them. Most of them were okay with it when she said, “I’m not feeling so great right now, but feel free to come up to me again later on if you see me up and walking around”, but a couple of different guys actually argued back with, "Why did you show up in that costume if you weren’t going to pose for me?". As though just by virtue of dressing up, she was somehow giving up her right as a human being to refuse to pose for pictures for them. One of the guys argued with us for well over five minutes about how she shouldn’t have come if she wasn’t going to let people take pictures, that she should just leave if she’s not feeling well (not because he was actually concerned for her health, but because he thought it was “misleading” that she was still there even though she was sick - because apparently her primary concern while having a hypoglycemia-induced panic attack should have been how her presence was affecting him), and saying stuff like, “Come on, it’ll only take a minute. I don’t care if you look sick, you don’t even have to pose. I just want to take a picture of your costume.”
If you see a person at a con harassing somebody because of what they’re wearing, please step in and say something. If I hadn’t been sitting there next to her to take over in telling him to fuck off, I don’t think she would have had the energy to keep verbally resisting him. She is by no means a pushover, but he may have succeeded in convincing her to stand back up and pose for him just to get him to leave her alone - and she has a history of fainting when her blood sugar gets low, so it’s entirely possible that she could have ended up fainting and hitting her head.
If somebody at a con tells you they’re not feeling well, leave them alone. If somebody at a con tells you they don’t want to take a picture for you, leave them alone. If somebody at a con tells you to leave them alone, leave them alone. It isn’t hard. Don’t be that guy.

I wanted to post because I’m sure a lot of you guys go to cons. I know it’s not Pokemon-related, but what happened to my friend shouldn’t have to happen to anyone. Please be aware.

alternative-pokemon-art:

fuffuster:

kuroba101:

her-royal-punk-rockness:

official-cronusampora:

sevvey6:

colin-emrys-morgan:

I recently went to a con with some friends and you could see these posters all over the expo grounds. I think I speak for everyone when I say that this is a job well done. 

I disagree, I think costumes do equal consent. If a guy goes up to you while you’re wearing a Harley Quinn costume and makes you feel uncomfortable, you automatically have his consent to knock him right in the face with a hammer. I mean, he did willingly walk up to a kickass villain 

I GOT REALLY PISSED AT FIRST

AND THEN I KEPT READING

Oh thank goodness I thought shit was about to get real on this post

Thank fuck that went in a better direction than I expected.

This is my friend Kristen. I went to my first Comicon with her and two of our other friends a couple of months ago. It was the first time I’ve ever been to Comicon, and I had a blast.

Kristen is a beautiful girl and she made her costume very well, so naturally, we were stopping every five minutes or so while people asked to take pictures of her posing, or with their kids, etc. We didn’t mind, and neither did she; if she did, she wouldn’t have worn the costume.

At one point, though, after not having eaten all day, and just generally not feeling well, she started to feel sick and panicky, and had to sit down so she wouldn’t faint. I myself have an anxiety disorder (generalized anxiety disorder), so I know how she felt; our other two friends went ahead while I sat with her to keep her company, because sometimes when you’re having a panic attack, it means the world just to have somebody there with you, even if they’re not saying anything. I went to get her some orange juice and cookies at one point because I thought that maybe her blood sugar was a little low.

And yet, as we were sitting there - even though she was visibly pale and shaking, sitting with her eyes closed and her back against the wall, looking like she was about to throw up - we had at least half a dozen different people come up to her to ask her to take a picture for them. Most of them were okay with it when she said, “I’m not feeling so great right now, but feel free to come up to me again later on if you see me up and walking around”, but a couple of different guys actually argued back with, "Why did you show up in that costume if you weren’t going to pose for me?". As though just by virtue of dressing up, she was somehow giving up her right as a human being to refuse to pose for pictures for them. One of the guys argued with us for well over five minutes about how she shouldn’t have come if she wasn’t going to let people take pictures, that she should just leave if she’s not feeling well (not because he was actually concerned for her health, but because he thought it was “misleading” that she was still there even though she was sick - because apparently her primary concern while having a hypoglycemia-induced panic attack should have been how her presence was affecting him), and saying stuff like, “Come on, it’ll only take a minute. I don’t care if you look sick, you don’t even have to pose. I just want to take a picture of your costume.”

If you see a person at a con harassing somebody because of what they’re wearing, please step in and say something. If I hadn’t been sitting there next to her to take over in telling him to fuck off, I don’t think she would have had the energy to keep verbally resisting him. She is by no means a pushover, but he may have succeeded in convincing her to stand back up and pose for him just to get him to leave her alone - and she has a history of fainting when her blood sugar gets low, so it’s entirely possible that she could have ended up fainting and hitting her head.

If somebody at a con tells you they’re not feeling well, leave them alone. If somebody at a con tells you they don’t want to take a picture for you, leave them alone. If somebody at a con tells you to leave them alone, leave them alone. It isn’t hard. Don’t be that guy.

I wanted to post because I’m sure a lot of you guys go to cons. I know it’s not Pokemon-related, but what happened to my friend shouldn’t have to happen to anyone. Please be aware.

Take sides. Neutrality helps the oppressor, never the victim. Silence encourages the tormentor, never the tormented. — Elie Wiesel (via dangerouswitnesses)

(via thisisableism)

theroguefeminist:

lisaquestions:

theroguefeminist:

apersnicketylemon:

They/Their' as a singular pronoun is correct English.

Stop excusing your transphobia by saying it isn’t. You’re wrong.

It’s not though. I’m a nonbinary person who uses they/them pronouns. Hear me out.

I work at a tutoring center for teaching kids test prep. You know, ACT, SAT, what have you. And I am professionally obligated to teach kids singular they/them pronouns are not correct English. If they don’t know that they could get a lower score on the SAT or ACT.

I was also taught this in another tutoring job at my college. This is enforced as proscriptive grammar. This is Standardized English. They/them is taught as a strictly plural pronoun even if, in everyday usage, we often use they/them as singular. The rules of proscriptive grammar are arbitrary and while they change sometimes, when they are in vogue they are enforced strictly.

This is the thing about proscriptive grammar: it’s oppressive. The prime victims are people who are of color, poor, mentally disabled, and/or are English language learners. As other bloggers have said, making this argument is actually backwards because relying on proscriptive grammar to validate your pronouns is relying on an oppressive force. Also, no one abides by the rules of standardized English in their everyday speech or writing on the internet. The argument that they/them is incorrect grammar is just a red herring, an excuse to bully trans people. Furthermore, there’s a much larger conversation to be had about the oppressive nature of proscriptive grammar, which is decided by a whole bunch of old white dudes in academia.

Here’s the thing: language is always changing and evolving. Once you get to linguistics and past English grammar rules you start to see language as tools people use to communicate. Of course, as society changes, the nature of these tools changes. When you think of it this way, the idea of “correct grammar” ceases to make sense. As long as other people understand you, that means your tools are working. You successfully communicated! Congratulations, you’re language-ing right!

Proscriptive grammar always lags behind this process of language evolution, but it too, eventually changes. Some grammarians out there might have heard the rule “never end a sentence in a proposition.” This rule became in vogue because some stuffy white professor with a hard on for Latin and pedantry thought, “hey, in Latin you never end in a proposition! This is a travesty of the English language up with which I will not put!” and convinced a whole bunch of other stuffy old white dudes of the same thing. But that makes no sense! English is not Latin! It’s a completely different language. Sure, Latin gives us some roots and stuff, but grammatically it’s incredibly different from English. Nowadays, no one enforces that old rule. Even the SAT handbooks say it’s okay to end in a preposition.

Back to oppressive pronouns: it used to be that everyone used “he/him/his” as general singular pronouns for the human race. “A man will never reach his potential if he never takes risks,” “when approaching a customer, ask what he needs” etc. Feminism changed that because, obviously, it leaves women out of the equation. I’m sure men back in the day made the same kind of arguments against using “him or her” that the singular they nay sayers make: “but it’s not proper English!” “but that’s just the RULES!” etc etc. Again, none of the rules really should matter, as long as you are understood. The only reason they matter more than that is due to people in power abusing their power. If you know standardized English, it’s a class marker. You are “educated.” Even though no one talks like that or writes like that outside of very specific environments. It’s a gate keeping tactic.

Easily, I think “him or her” could change to singular “they” in formal usage for someone of an unknown gender or a hypothetical person, especially since “him or her/she or he” becomes very awkward in certain sentences (or with repetitive use in a given work). What’s going to take more time is singular “they” for trans and nonbinary people becoming accepted in formal writing. That would require broader acceptance of nonbinary people. That’s not going to happen any time soon.

So this whole discussion about singular they is actually a much more complex one. Saying (inaccurately and untruthfully) that singular they is standard English will accomplish nothing. Putting pressure on people to change proscriptive grammar rules to use they/them would accomplish more, but you still have the problem of Standard English as a gate keeping tactic and playing into the elitist mess to win points with those in power. The fact of the matter is that those in power control Standard English and they don’t control informal English. Standard English is used to gatekeep certain elitist spheres from those who are of lower socioeconomic status and those of color. Investing value in that system and acting as if we need its okay to defend the use of they/them pronouns is actually harmful. It’s throwing PoC and lower class people under the bus.

You shouldn’t let people use Standard English to come into conversations about everyday use. It’s incredibly classist and racist. Seriously. And you play right into their hands when you act like you need the approval of the powers that be to validate your everyday language use. Whether they think they/them is correct is beside the point. They also think AAVE is uncivilized nonsense. Those are the people you’re appealing to.

So no, they/them is not “correct” in the sense of proscriptive/standardized English. I know because I have to tell students singular they/them (which are my personal pronouns) are grammatically incorrect at my job (note that I’ve only told people on tumblr and close friends my pronouns). I know because when I failed to catch the use of singular they in an article I used for curricula at my job, I got criticized for it and told to not let that error slip. Saying otherwise does no one any favors. And while it is true that in everyday speech, singular they is used far more often than she/he, cis people don’t care. They will use whatever excuse or argument to justify their cissexism. Will they rely on arbitrary, irrelevant and oppressive structures like proscriptive grammar to do so? You bet. But we, on the other side, don’t have to play their game to stand up against them. It makes more sense to accurately label standardized grammar as irrelevant to common speech and as oppressive. To call cis people out on their bullshit because I can guarantee they do NOT utilize Standard English in their everyday speech. To use the linguistic approach to changing grammar. To accurately point out singular they’s commonality in everyday speech. To dismantle their arguments by pointing out their inconsistency and unreasonableness. Let’s not play the game by their rules. Their rules are unfair and harmful.

But singular they is correct English. It is not taught as correct English in an academic sense, but academic English is not the same as business English is not the same as colloquial English and that’s just talking about the US, and not getting into other nations that use English.

It is true that standardized grammar is oppressive, but it is not the be-all and end-all of how English is used.

Singular “they” and the reasons it is correct.

Singular they

Is “they” acceptable as a singular pronoun?

If someone tells you singular ‘they’ is wrong, please do tell them to get stuffed

In some contexts, as you describe, people do not accept singular “they”, but there is no such thing as standard English, there never has been such a thing, and there never will be such a thing. There are some forms of English which people call “standard” or “standardized” but that is useful in terms of referring to a specific category of grammar rules, not the real one true way the language is supposed to be used. 

I never said that standard English is the same as colloquial English or business English. I also never said that they/them wasn’t used in everyday language. In fact I specifically said standardized English and conversational English were completely different. I said that standard English only applied to incredibly limited formal environments and it’s used as a gate keeping mechanism. I also said that it shouldn’t be applied to everyday speech.

I’m really not sure what you’re disagreeing with. Because there’s plenty of pronouns that aren’t even used in colloquial English, either—like xie/xir/xirs. Whatever is perceived as “correct” is arbitrary and irrelevant is my point. Relying on an argument about the “correctness” of they/them is backwards.

You can say standardized English isn’t real until you’re blue in the face, but people will still enforce formal grammatical rules and use them as a gate keeping tool. I’ve seen it happen. And these rules do influence people beyond academia. There’s a reason so many people say they/them isn’t correct. That’s what they were taught in school. They didn’t get this from thin air. There’s a reason pedants will correct a random person saying “me and Jasmine went to the store” to say “Jasmine and I” even though it shouldn’t matter. Ideas about correct grammar permeate our lives in terms of class and real lived experiences. It’s partially why people will act like AAVE is grammatically incorrect: people don’t get that language is just a matter of use and that there are many dialects. They think there is some set in stone way “proper” English operates. I, like you, don’t think that’s the case. But the people who do create rules in formal setting do influence ideas about language in this way (which does result in classism and racism).

As someone who has worked as an English tutor in numerous work environments (and as an editor), I have found I have to teach and enforce standardized grammar, which is real and has a very strict set of rules. I even had to mark down an essay by one of the best writers in my group of students a full point out of 6 because she’s an English language learner. It’s not a grade in school: it’s feedback so she’ll know realistically what she’ll get on the SAT and the reality is she will probably be marked down for grammar even if though she will likely write an essay much better than most of her peers. Standard English is a construct and it’s a shitty one but the ramifications are very real.

Again, I’m wondering if there’s a miscommunication. I don’t agree with enforcing standard English. And it only is relevant in very limited situations, and I stressed multiple times it’s not used in everyday language. My point is anytime you talk about something being “correct” or “incorrect” English, unless you’re talking about phrasing or punctuation that is incomprehensible or never used in our language, you are invoking and reinforcing a classist and racist system. And it’s one that should be questioned, not supported. It’s also ignoring the fact that practitioners and enforcers of standard grammar continually deny they/them is correct. And as long as those in power keep saying it, those arguments will have an influence.

But my point is not contrary to yours because I was trying to say in my post that it doesn’t matter what the enforcers of proscriptive grammar say. I said they don’t control everyday speech and I stand by that which is why we can argue for they/them use without talking about what is correct or not in formal environments irrelevant to most situations anyway. Trying to get academia to accept it is another question.

We’re not stupid, and most teenagers and children aren’t either if you give them a chance and try to explain a situation to them. Seriously, there must be something more productive and positive to say when faced with tough questions than “you’re too young to understand that.”

These types of responses shut the younger person down completely. It closes the conversation because it doesn’t allow a valid response. No one can agree or disagree with this statement because the future is unknown. I might understand when I’m older, I might never understand, we don’t know. And you can’t predict my future, so please try not to, especially if you’re going to shut me down in the present. I honestly never know what to say when people tell me this. There is nothing that I can think of that will satisfy me while continuing the conversation.

Why You Should Stop Telling People “You’ll Understand When You’re Older”

(via feminspire)

rebelwithoutabroom:

Harry Potter AU in which Remus Lupin doesn’t leave Hogwarts after Snape tells everyone he’s a werewolf

instead, he fucking stays where he belongs

and, as the howlers start coming, insults exploding at the teacher’s table every morning like clockwork, the students take notice. They see Lupin’s face, and he’s not even angry, he looks fucking resigned to it, like he deserves it.

So, the students take matters into their own hands. 

"You’re the best teacher EVER" is heard on a Monday morning, followed by a “We really like your classes” on Tuesday and “Thanks for being such a cool guy. AND FOR THE CHOCOLATES” on Wednesday.

by Friday, things have escalated to the point that you can’t  go ten minutes without a howler bursting and showering Lupin in compliments.

(It’s a whole month before the fateful “YOU HAVE A VERY CUTE ASS, 10/10 WOULD BANG! ” and the subsequent banning of all howlers for the teachers.

Snape has never looked more constipated in his life.)

(via boysinperil)

ludicrouscupcake:

poppy-the-knight:

sourcedumal:

I Love My Boo campaign features real young men of color loving each other passionately. Rather than sexualizing gay relationships, this campaign models caring, and highlights the importance of us taking care of each other. Featured throughout New York City, I Love My Boo directly challenges homophobia and encourages all who come across it to critically rethink our notion of love.

GMHC is the world’s first and leading provider of HIV/AIDS prevention, care and advocacy. Building on decades of dedication and expertise, we understand the reality of HIV/AIDS and empower a healthy life for all. GMHC fights to end the AIDS epidemic and uplift the lives of all affected.

this is fucking adorable

SPREAD THESE IMAGES LIKE WILDFIRE PRECISELY BECAUSE THEY FUCK UP THE MISGUIDED STEREOTYPES WE ALL ARE USED TO SEEING.

(via racism-sexist-ableism-ohmy)

aleatoryw:

justsomecrazydreamer:

Glamour finally speaking my language

FICS BEFORE DICKS

aleatoryw:

justsomecrazydreamer:

Glamour finally speaking my language

FICS BEFORE DICKS

(via annekewrites)

stuffmomnevertoldyou:

There is a thing called the Hot-Crazy Matrix, and it is terrible. And even more terrible is how many folks think it’s just a joke that also gets at the truth of how women are usually crazy nutbags.

Here’s our response, starring a sauve guy named Dilmint.

Warning for the t-slur (well it’s there in the picture… sorry about that >_> ) 

newyorker:

Artist Eric Drooker shares the inspiration behind next week’s cover, “Ferguson, Missouri.”

newyorker:

Artist Eric Drooker shares the inspiration behind next week’s cover, “Ferguson, Missouri.”